Mission Statement:

To educate present and future generations of the public about the history and development of that geographical area encompassing the original Salem Village and the Town of Danvers, Massachusetts, by preserving materials and information relating to such history through such activities as allowed to a non profit corporation under Massachusetts law, including, but not limited to, the maintenance of a Museum, the acquisition, maintenance, and preservation of collections of objects, artifacts, documents, and significant Danvers structures and properties, and the conducting of educational and publication programs, lectures and other events.

Adopted January 1, 1889; Restated June 10, 2009

From the President

In 1865, the Civil War ended and our country was reunited. Four years later, the people of Danvers founded the Danvers Historical Society. The purpose of this organization was “to discover, collect and preserve objects which illustrate local history, but particularly the history, development and people of the Town of Danvers.”

This celebrated decision was an expression of triumph, hope, and optimism for the generations that would follow. The founders understood that a society that abandons its history, in a sense loses itself. A society that abandons its culture and traditions is a one that loses its identity.

The Danvers Historical Society is dedicated to ensuring that the many stories of our extraordinary town are preserved for present and future generations to experience and cherish. Through the hard work of countless volunteers, staff, and trustees, priceless artifacts, documents, and properties are being cared for and made available for the world to see.

And now, the challenges are greater than ever. Financial support and community involvement are needed to sustain our properties and continue our mission.

Please take some time to explore our website and learn about our remarkable properties, collections and enrichment programs. Then please consider joining us in our efforts to preserve and expand our offerings for all to enjoy!

Thank you, and welcome!

Thomas M. Page

President
Danvers Historical Society

The Danvers Historical Society was founded and created in 1889 by Reverend Alfred Porter Putnam D.D. After the conception of the Society he headed the board as president for many years.
Putnam was born and raised in Danvers, he worked with his father who was the president of Village Bank, but after three years he left Danvers to pursue his education. Entering Dartmouth for a year and then transferring to Brown University to finish the remainder of three years and obtaining his D.D., Putnam soon returned to Danvers to teach. He returned to his own education attending Harvard Divinity School, graduating in 1855. He left the States for an extensive tour of Europe, Upon returning to the states, he settled in Brooklyn NY at the First Unitarian Society, where he remained for twenty-two years. Putnam helped create the Third Unitarian Church of Brooklyn, he also headed many charitable enterprises within Brooklyn. He married twice first to Louisa P. Preston of Danvers and the second time to Eliza K. Buttrick of Concord MA. Mr. Putnam published hundreds of books and was an accomplished lecturer.
When his health began to fail, he retired from the church he loved, turning his focus to his next love, local history. His love for history, especially Danvers history is what brought him to return home to Danvers. He spent his last years within the confines of his ancestral home; he died in Salem May 15, 1906 survived by his wife Eliza.

The Danvers Historical Society was founded and created in 1889 by Reverend Alfred Porter Putnam D.D. After the conception of the Society he headed the board as president for many years.

Putnam was born and raised in Danvers, he worked with his father who was the president of Village Bank, but after three years he left Danvers to pursue his education. Entering Dartmouth for a year and then transferring to Brown University to finish the remainder of three years and obtaining his D.D., Putnam soon returned to Danvers to teach. He returned to his own education attending Harvard Divinity School, graduating in 1855. He left the States for an extensive tour of Europe, Upon returning to the states, he settled in Brooklyn NY at the First Unitarian Society, where he remained for twenty-two years. Putnam helped create the Third Unitarian Church of Brooklyn, he also headed many charitable enterprises within Brooklyn. He married twice first to Louisa P. Preston of Danvers and the second time to Eliza K. Buttrick of Concord MA. Mr. Putnam published hundreds of books and was an accomplished lecturer.

When his health began to fail, he retired from the church he loved, turning his focus to his next love, local history. His love for history, especially Danvers history is what brought him to return home to Danvers. He spent his last years within the confines of his ancestral home; he died in Salem May 15, 1906 survived by his wife Eliza.

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Staff

Dana Bennett-Jeffreys, CCAP – Grounds Staff
Laura Cilley – Communications Director
Christian Clemson – Buildings and Grounds Restoration Assistant Manager
Tyler Gaudet – Grounds Staff
Matthew  Martin, MCA – Buildings and Grounds Restoration Manager
Heather Palm – Director of Sales & Events
Nora Whouley – Assistant Communications Director

Trustees

Thomas M. Page, President
David P. McKenna, Vice-President
Ellen Graham, Secretary
Robert B. Young, Treasurer, pro tem
Louann Basillio
Katelyn Burke
Kacey Desmond
Leonel Espinal
Maryann Tapparo
Susan Ambrozavitch, at-large
Ingrid Barry, at-large
Jonathan Gilbert, at-large
Nellie Homen, at-large
David M. McIntire, at-large
Lucas Noble, at-large
Michael Randall, at-large